Monthly Archives: November 2012

Not Take

SUBMISSION FOR MEMOIR CLASS:

Thinking about a road I haven’t taken is a difficult subject, because there are many paths I wish I could have taken, but didn’t. So where does one possibly begin with a subject like this? I could go on about all those missed opportunities, but who’s to know where I’d be if I had taken those paths?

Thinking about all those roads I didn’t take brings up more questions than trying to think of just one opportunity that I missed. They’re not even “what if” questions, but “would I” questions.

Would I be living in the same city I grew up in? Would I still have my same group of friends? Would I have a full-time, permanent job, or would I still be a student somewhere?

There are so many things I wish I could have done, but I think that fate has a lot to do with where I’ve ended up. “Everything happens for a reason,” they say. So, did I stay at home and get accepted into a local university for a reason? Is there a reason that I didn’t have a job for two years? Were some unseen forces working to prevent me from traveling because I could have gotten hurt while I was overseas?

Again, there are so many questions when pondering the opportunities that I didn’t take, but all of them lead back to the sole question that’s nagged at me for the ten minutes I’ve been writing this: Where would I be right now if I’d taken one of those other roads?

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Repeat

SUBMISSION FOR MEMOIR CLASS:

One thing I remember having to start over again was my novel. I started writing it in high school, and it took me eight years to write. The very first draft that I ever wrote, which was about ¼ of the novel was lost when my computer died, and I had to start over again from scratch. Of course, I was livid, hurt, disappointed, and frustrated that I’d lost so much of my novel because my computer decided to crap out on me one day.

As I started re-working on the novel, I remembered some details, dialogue, and events that happened in the part of the novel that was lost. Of course, I didn’t remember all of it, certainly not word-for-word, but I remembered some, so that’s saying something, I guess. Since I couldn’t remember all of what was lost, I was really angry and frustrated that I’d lost everything. Not only was it time-consuming to write everything all over again, it was a pain trying to remember it all; and when I couldn’t, I had to write something new.

The second time around, however, I learned my lesson (as it applies now to anything I work on, whether it’s assignments, essays, or creative writing): I save everything on a flash drive. My mother thinks I’m crazy that I have a keychain with five flash drives on it, but I don’t want to take the risk of losing something important again. Sure, one’s for music, another’s for pictures, and three are for writing, but having them gives me peace of mind, so that I don’t have to stress, thinking I’ll lose everything if my laptop dies.

Although it was a traumatic experience, losing my novel, I learned my lesson: always save your work on a back-up drive, whether it’s another hard drive, a flash drive, or online somewhere.

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